Lact - Palo Alto School Representative


Palo Alto School Representative

Center for training, intervention and research

Strategic systemic approach and hypnosis

 01 48 07 40 40  | 

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      Communication is an art. How to develop effective communication using a systemic approach?

      Communication, what is it

      Communication, what is it? 

      Communication is one of the most fundamental functions of life. In management situations, it can help make good decisions, develop well-designed plans, establish a strong organizational structure, and create good relationships with colleagues. Communication is essential to achieve managerial and organizational effectiveness. Good communication helps employees become more engaged in their work and better understand their role. Clear, accurate and timely communication of information also prevents organizational problems from arising.

      Without communication, employees will not be aware of what their colleagues are doing, have no idea of ​​their goals, and will not be able to evaluate their performance. Managers will not be able to give instructions to their subordinates and management will not receive the information they need to develop plans and make decisions. Communication is therefore the nervous system of any organization.

      Metis

      The ancient idea of ​​mestizo and the art of practical intelligence originated in Greece. Métis was considered best suited to fluid, dynamic, fast moving, uncertain and contrary situations (Freedman: 2013). Cultivating and generating an ability to adapt to ever-changing events with sufficient flexibility is considered paramount in this philosophy, just as we have had to do throughout the Covid-19 lockdowns. Practical intelligence allows one to demonstrate foresight, speed, and a capacity for cunning and deception. All of these qualities are necessary for the use of strategic intelligence.

      Persuasion, that is, the ability to use rhetoric and the correct use of language, is also an essential element of an effective strategy. The Greek Pericles reminded Protagoras that those who have "knowledge but lack the power to express it, might as well have no ideas at all" and therefore, at the heart of all effective strategies, finds the ability to communicate strategically and persuasively to achieve goals. By leveraging the behavioral effects of language using what we call injunctive and performative language (Spencer-Brown: 1967), we can create amazing effects to promote change, define solutions, or inhibit undesirable behaviors.

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      Important nonverbal aspects

      Effective strategies generally involve

      • Empathy for the situation of the adversary or ally, sufficient to have influence.
      • Exceptional ability or strength, enough to impress or intimidate others.
      • The ability to build effective relationships and coalitions.
      • An understanding of how to communicate effectively on a personal and organizational level.

      Communication

      Persuasive communication and the use of both verbal and non-verbal aspects of communication are essential to any effective professional or personal endeavor. Understanding other people's belief and value systems and adapting to their unique communication style are essential parts of a strategic approach to life. It is the deliberate and conscious use of persuasive communication as the primary driver of change that differentiates the strategic approach from others and will constitute the success or failure of a strategy. At the interpersonal level, we need to pay attention to the verbal and non-verbal aspects of communication.

      Important non-verbal aspects of the consultation:

      • The first impression, which must have a strong impact.
      • Good eye contact.
      • Body space, posture and body language.

      Important verbal aspects:

      • Evoking specific emotions through dialogue.
      • Strategic dialogue - a suggestive and evocative form of communication.
      • Use of metaphors, stories, etc.
      Impact on businesses

      Impact on businesses

      Research conducted at the Human Dynamics - MIT Media Lab in the United States showed that 90% of the impact business leaders have during a presentation has little to do with what was said. A Harvard psychologist, Nailini Ambady (1993), showed that we can judge a person's character traits in less than six seconds, even from a video clip without sound (Yeung: 2011).

      These studies and many others have repeatedly shown the effect of body language on how people judge us and behave towards us (Cialdini: 2006). The non-verbal aspects of our communication amplify or reduce the effects of the words we use, which is why non-verbal communication should normally take precedence over verbal communication. Eye contact between people should also be considered as a communication phenomenon that can help establish a meaningful relationship.

      Eye contact

      Burnett and Motowidlo (1998) found, in their study of managerial job applicants during an interview (using a measure of four nonverbal behaviors), that good eye contact was one of the behaviors predictive of a positive outcome. From a very young age, babies seek positive eye contact with their caregiver, which has a significant effect on their development. Neuroscience research shows that eye contact activates parts of the brain related to attraction (Duhigg: 2011), which is important when seeking to exert influence. Our desire and need for effective eye contact is ingrained within us. A Canadian study (Hemsley and Doob: 1978) found that in criminal cases, juries were more likely to convict a person accused of a crime if they failed to hold the prosecutor's gaze long enough.

      Avoid folklore

      Contrary to popular belief, too assertive or confident eye contact can actually prevent the creation of a warm or effective relationship. By continually and subtly alternating eye contact between the eyes and other parts of a person's face and body, we can allow the client to experience a more comfortable interaction and create a more effective and warm exchange. This feeling will be even stronger during the first meeting and the first stages of the relationship. The opposite is also true: as the relationship evolves, we must not give the client the impression that we cannot fix our eyes on him or that he cannot catch our gaze either, because it would have the opposite effect, as we have already mentioned. Humans are wired for eye contact and while it is important, it must be managed based on the purpose and phase of the consulting relationship.

      Reference

      • Gibson, P. (2022) The Persuasion Principle. Communication Strategies to Persuade and Influence. Strategic Science Books.

      A team of more than
      50 trainers in France
      and abroad

      of our students satisfied with
      their training year at LACT *

      International partnerships

      The quality certification was issued under
      the following category of actions: Training action

      A team of more than
      50 trainers in France
      and abroad

      of our students satisfied with
      their training year at LACT *

      International partnerships

      The quality certification was issued under
      the following category of actions: Training action

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